Mi-24 Hind (Mi-35 Export Version)


The Mi-24 (NATO designation Hind) is one of the most widely-known assault helicopter gunships in the world, and remains in service with at least 50 air arms. tumblr_nm3u9hRXbU1r94kvzo8_1280

The Mi-24 was developed from the tried and tested Mi-8 multirole transport helicopter and was first flown in V-24 prototype form in 1969. Production commenced in 1971 and ceased in 1991. Over 2,300 Hinds of all variants were produced.

The definitive initial production variant was the Mi-24D Hind-D (Mi-25 for export). This introduced heavily-armored, stepped cockpits ant an undernose gun turret. Vital components of the helicopter are also armored. This gunship has a crew of three and can carry up to 8 fully-equipped troops.

Russia to start fitting Mi-24 gunships with Vitebsk electronic warfare system: HERE

mi-24-mi-24-hind-931162-1920x1080OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

From 1976 to 1978, the Hind-D was joined in service by the up-engined Mi-24V Hind-E (export Mi-35), which also featured improved armament of tube-launched 9M114 Shturm (AT-6 Spiral) ATGMs.

1287145867_mi2405_conv.jpg9M114 Shturm (AT-6 Spiral) ATGMs.

Combat experience in Afghanistan led to the development of the Mi-24P Hind-F with a 30-mm GSh-30K twinbarrel cannon mounted on the forward fuselage. Later specialised Hind variants include the Mi-24RKR Hind-G1 NBC reconnaissance helicopter; Mi-24K Hind-G2 for artillery fire correction; Mi-24BMT minesweeper conversion and Mi-24PS for paramilitary use.

dsc_436430-mm GSh-30K twinbarrel cannon

At the beggining of the 21 century Mi-24s remains in widespread service, the Russian army being the most significant operator with around 700 helicopters. Other major users include Algeria, Angola, Belarus, Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Kazakhstan, Libya and Poland. The Mi-24 has seen widespread combat action, fighting in Afghanistan, Chad, Angola, Sri Lanka and, most recently, in the wars in Chechnya in 1995 and 1999. The market for upgrades is substantial, with an estimated 1 500 Hinds remaining in service. A number of programmes are available.

full-hd-the-mi-24-helicopter-cool-wallpapers-for-android-1024x681Cockpit of Venezuelan Mi-35 Gunship Helicopter Mi-24P (Mi-25 and Mi-35) Hind Attack Transport Helicopter (8)Upgraded Cockpit Venezuelan Mi-35IMG_9224-2Pilot SeatLl7IHbRGunner seat

The Mi-24VM (export designation Mi-35M) is available from Mil as a staged upgrade that includes a refurbished airframe for prolonged service, Mi-28 dynamic systems, upgraded 2,194-shp (1 636-kW) TV3-117VMA engines, and MFD-equipped cockpit compatible with night vision googles, pilot’s head-up display, forward-looking infra-red, a nose turret carrying a GSh-231 23-mm two-barrel cannon, 9M120 (AT-12 Swinger) ATGMs, and compatibility with 9M39 Igla (SA-18 Grouse) air-to-air missiles. Mil proposes to upgrade around 200 Russian Federation Hinds to these standards as Mi-24VMs, but the future of this programme is uncertain.

Tv3_117Vm2,194-shp (1 636-kW) TV3-117VMA enginesAIMG_0050X612X121_Berezin_GSh-23LCannonGSh-231 23-mm two-barrel cannon1287145867_Mi-24%2520Gunpod%2520Kiev_conv.jpgKrzesiny_82RBotr_gun_yak-b_o1

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2–3: pilot, weapons system officer and technician (optional)
  • Capacity: 8 troops or 4 stretchers or 2400 kg (5,291 lb) cargo on an external sling
  • Length: 17.5 m (57 ft 4 in)
  • Rotor diameter: 17.3 m (56 ft 7 in)
  • Wingspan: 6.5 m (21 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 6.5 m (21 ft 3 in)
  • Disc area: 235 m² (2,530 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 8,500 kg (18,740 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 12,000 kg (26,500 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Isotov TV3-117 turbines, 1,600 kW (2,200 hp) each


Internal guns
  • flexible 12.7 mm Yakushev-Borzov Yak-B Gatling gun on most variants. Maximum of 1,470 rounds of ammunition.
  • fixed twin-barrel GSh-30K on the Mi-24P. 750 rounds of ammunition.
  • flexible twin-barrel Gryazev-Shipunov GSh-23L on the Mi-24VP and Mi-24VM. 450 rounds of ammunition.
  • PKB passenger compartment window mounted machine guns
External stores
  • Total payload is 1,500 kg of external stores.
  • Inner hardpoints can carry at least 500 kg
  • Outer hardpoints can carry up to 250 kg
  • Wing-tip pylons can only carry the 9M17 Phalanga (in the Mi-24A-D) or the 9K114 Shturm complex (in the Mi-24V-F).
  • Bombs within weight range (presumably ZAB, FAB, RBK, ODAB etc.), Up to 500 kg.
  • MBD multiple ejector racks (presumably MBD-4 with 4 × FAB-100)
  • KGMU2V submunition/mine dispenser pods
First-generation armament (standard production Mi-24D)
Second-generation armament (Mi-24V, Mi-24P and most upgraded Mi-24D)
  • UPK-23-250 gunpod carrying the GSh-23L
  • B-8V20 a lightweight long tubed helicopter version of the S-8 rocket launcher
  • 9K114 Shturm in pairs on the outer and wingtip pylons
151399_800Upgraded cockpit1287143413_1509381297131433_UB-32-57%2520S-5%2520rocket%2520launchersmi-35m1287145867_Later_Hind_series_conv.png

Source: Military Today, Wiki,

Video Hind in Syria Operations


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