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Russia to deploy missile systems on Kuril islands: Minister

 

By AFP     3 hours ago in World

Russia will deploy a range of coastal missile systems on the far-eastern Kuril islands, claimed by Japan, as part of its military build-up in the region, Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said Friday.

“The planned rearmament of contingents and military bases on Kuril islands is under way. Already this year they will get Bal and Bastion coastal missile systems as well as new-generation Eleron-3 unmanned aerial vehicles,” Shoigu said during a ministry meeting.

Russia has been investing in military infrastructure on the Kuril islands, which Japan considers its territory, over the last few years, including building new barracks for personnel.

Shoigu said at the meeting that the military is focusing on “developing military infrastructure in the Arctic and Kuril island zones.”

Relations between Moscow and Tokyo have been strained for decades because of the status of the four southernmost islands in the Kuril chain, known as the Northern Territories in Japan.

Map locating the disputed Kuril islands off eastern Russia's Kamchatka peninsulaMap locating the disputed Kuril islands off eastern Russia’s Kamchatka peninsula, AFP/File

The Russian navy’s Pacific fleet next month will embark on a three-month mission to the Kurils to explore whether the islands could serve as a naval base as well.

This year and next year Russia is set to put up more than 350 buildings for military needs on the Kuril islands of Iturup and Kunashir, called Etorofu and Kunashiri in Japan.

Some 19,000 Russians live on the remote rocky islands, which were occupied by Soviet troops in the dying days of World War II.

The two countries have never officially struck a peace treaty and the lingering tensions over the issue have hampered trade ties for decades.

@digitaljournal.com

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Bal coastal missile systems

BAL-E Coastal Missile System with Kh-35E (3M-24E) Anti-ship Missiles

The Bal-E mobile coastal missile system is designed:

– to control straits and territorial waters;

– to protect naval bases, other coastal installations and infrastructures;

– to defend coastline in probable landing approach areas.

The missile system can conduct combat actions, providing fully autonomous after-launch missile guidance in fair and adverse weather conditions, by day and night, under enemy fire and electronic countermeasures.

The Bal-E is a mobile weapon system, based on the MAZ 7930 chassis, comprising:

– up to two self-propelled command, control and communications (C3) posts;

– up to four self-propelld launchers with the Kh-35E (3M-24E) type anti-ship missiles in transport-launch containers (eight TLCs on a standard launcher);

– up to four transport-reload vehicles intended for preparing the next salvo.

The C3 post provides target reconnaissance, designation and optimal distribution between launchers. Active and passive high-precision radar channels allow the system to implement flexible target acquisition strategies, including covert ones.

The launchers and transport-reload vehicles can be deployed in covered positions in the depth beyond the coastline. In this case neither covertness of their combat positions nor man-made and natural obstacles in the direction of fire will limit combat imployment of the system.

The system can conduct both single and salvo fire from any launcher, with the capability of receiving current information from other command posts and external reconnaissance/target disignation data sources.

A salvo can include up to 32 missiles. One such salvo can thwart a combat mission carried out by an enemy naval attack group, a landing force or a convoy.

The system can fire the next salvo in 30-40 minutes thanks to its transport-reload vehicles. Combat management of the Bal-E assets is based on digital data transmission, automated communications, message processing and ciphering with guaranteed security.

The system is equipped with night vision, navigation, survey and positioning aids enabling it to rapidly change its firing positions after completing the assigned mission, and relocate to a new combat area.

The system can be deployed in the new position within 10 minutes.

An integrated coastal defence system combining the  Bal-E CMS, offshore patrol vessels with the Uran-E ship-borne missile systems and missile-carrying combat aircraft armed with the Kh-35E (3M-24E) unified anti-ship missiles, would be able to perform diverse operational and tactical tasks at minimal costs thanks to a single missile maintenance and repair system.

The system’s structure and exact number of the C3 posts, launch and transport-reload vehicles are defined according to customer requirements. The MAZ-7930 self-propelled chassis can be replaced with other types of chssis (it can be proposed for the light-configuration Bal-E CMS with enhanced agility and off-road capacity).

The Bal-E CMS has a considerable potential for upgrading.

Employment of additional target designation assets, such as radar picket helicopters or remotely piloted aerial vehicles, allows the system to increase its target detection range and precision.

The Bal-E CMS can be equipped with passive interference systems to considerably enhance its invulnerability to enemy guided weapons in dueling situations. Other upgrading options are also considered.

Prime developer: Machine-Building Design Bureau

Performance:

 Engagement range (from coastline), km  up to 120
 Fire position distance from coastline, km  up to 10
 Launcher/transport-reloader
 ammunition load, msls  up to 8
 Inter-missile launch time (in salvo),sec  not more than 3
 Max speed, km/h:
 on road  60
 off road  20
 Missile launch weight, kg  about 620
 Total ammunition load, msls  up to 64
 Endurance range (without refueling), km  not less than 850

@eng.ktrv.ru

Weapon Poseidon

The design of the Kh-35
1. Radar homing. 2. Penetrating warhead. 3. System liquidation. 4. Inertial guidance system. 5. Radio altimeter. 6. Intake. 7. Fuel System. 8. Turbofan engine. 9. Managing drive. 10. Tverdotoplivnyy boosters.

Bastion coastal missile systems

The Bastion battery comprises 18 mobile launchers each carrying two 3M55E Yakhont supersonic cruise missiles capable of striking surface targets on land and at sea at a range of 300 km, with their devastating 200 kg warhead. @defense-update.com

The bastion battery comprises eight twin-missile mobile launchers, command and control vehicles and logistics support trucks. @defense-update.com3M55E Yakhont supersonic cruise missiles

The P-800 Oniks (Russian: П-800 Оникс; English: Onyx), also known in export markets as Yakhont (Russian: Яхонт; English: ruby), is a Soviet/Russian supersonic anti-ship cruise missile developed by NPO Mashinostroyeniya as a ramjet version of P-80 Zubr. Its GRAU designation is 3M55, the air launched Kh-61 variant also exists. Development officially started in 1983, and by 2001 allowed the launch of the missile from land, sea, air and submarine. The missile has the NATO reporting codename SS-N-26 “Strobile”. It is reportedly a replacement for the P-270 Moskit, but possibly also for the P-700 Granit. The P-800 was reportedly used as the basis for the joint Russian-Indian supersonic missile BrahMos.

Specifications

  • Length: 8.9 m
  • Diameter: 0.7 m
  • Wingspan: 1.7 m
  • Weight: 3,100 kg
  • Speed at altitude: 750 m/s (Mach 2.6)
  • Surface speed: Mach 2
  • Engine: ramjet, weight 200 kg, 4 tons of thrust
  • Range: 120–300 km
  • for the combined trajectory (hi-lo) – 300 km
  • for low-altitude trajectory (lo-lo) – 120 km
  • Flight altitude of 10,000–14,000 m
  • Warhead: 250 kg
  • Period of storage: 7 years
  • Fuel: kerosene T-6

Radar homing head

  • all-weather monopulse active-passive, with frequency hopping
  • Immunity: high, from active spoofing, dipole clouds
  • Range: 50 km active
  • Launchable sea state – up to 7 points
  • Warm-up time from power on: no more than 2 min
  • Current consumption at 27 V circuit: up to 38 A
  • Maximum angle of the target search: ± 45 °
  • Homing weight: 85 kg

 

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