HH-101A Caesar Medium-Lift Helicopter, Italy

HH-101A Caesar medium-lift helicopter is designed and developed by AgustaWestland, a Finmeccanica company, based on the AW101 Combat Search and Rescue variant to meet the future operational requirements of the Italian Air Force.

The helicopter entered service with the Air Force’s 15th Wing in Cervia in June 2015. It is intended for special operations and personnel recovery missions and can also be used for search and rescue (SAR), medical evacuation (medevac) and slow mover intercept (SMI) operations.

A total of 15 HH-101A Caesar helicopters have been ordered to replace the Italian Air Force’s current fleet of Agusta / Sikorsky HH-3 Pelican amphibious medium-lift helicopters. The first two aircraft are configured for personnel recovery and special forces missions.

Maiden flight of the first HH-101A took place at AgustaWestland’s Yeovil facility in the UK in March 2014.

HH-101A Caesar helicopter design and features

The HH-101A Caesar helicopter features a versatile design and crashworthy airframe. It can be operated autonomously in harsh weathers and hostile environmental conditions and has a 30-minute transmission run-dry capability.

It is fitted with five advanced profile composite main rotor blades and four fully articulated tail rotors. The aircraft has efficient landing gear with castering / steerable nose-wheels permits safe for landing on rough terrains. Other features of HH-101A Caesar include a hydraulically-operated rear ramp, large cabin windows, and a wide cargo door.

The 22.83m-long and 6.66m-high helicopter has a rotor diameter of 18.6m, empty weight of more than 5,500kg and maximum gross weight of 15,600kg. A cargo hook attached to the helicopter supports external loads up to 4,536kg.

The HH-101A can be configured to accommodate a crew of up to five members and 20 fully-equipped personnel or six crew and eight special operation troops. An active control of structural response (ACSR) is installed to reduce the crew fatigue.

Source leonardocompany.com

Search and rescue equipment aboard the HH-101A includes a wireless intercom system, medical treatment module, dual rescue hoist, sea tray, controller, fast roping / rappelling, and stretcher racks. The air-to-air refuelling and hover-in-flight refuelling capabilities of the helicopter provide extend the flight endurance.

Cockpit and avionics

The NVG-compatible glass cockpit provides superior situational awareness for the operators. It is installed with five 10in x 8in displays, synthetic vision system, digital map, integrated mission console, and a mobile phone. Operators are provided with helmet-mounted displays with head tracker.

The integrated avionics suite consists of four-axis automatic flight control system (AFCS), traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS), helicopter terrain awareness systems (HTAWS), proximity detection system, TETRA radio communications system, and a mission recorder, as well as direction-finding and automatic identification systems (AIS), LIDAR obstacle detection system, and satellite communications (satcom) systems.

It also features an instrument flight rules (IFR) navigation suite, advanced 360° active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, health and usage monitoring systems (HUMS), and high-definition electro-optical sensors.

High-definition electro-optical sensors – jetphotos.com
  • NVG compatible glass cockpit with 5 off multi-configurable 10” x 8” LCD units
  • Two Aircraft Mission Management Computers (AMMCs) with Data Transfer Module
  • Two Multifunction Control and Display Units (MCDUs)
  • Dual duplex digital automatic flight control system
  • Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS)
  • Integrated standby instruments
  • Comprehensive communication and navigation suite
  • Cockpit and cabin intercommunication system
  • Belly mounted 360 degree Surveillance Radar
  • Nose mounted Search / weather radar
  • Integrated mission console
  • Electro-Optics System
  • SATCOM
  • Digital map system
  • EGPWS
  • TCAS
  • TACAN
  • Doppler velocity sensor
  • Obstacle Warning System
  • Direction Finder and Personnel Locator Systems
  • High intensity search light and loud speaker
  • Mission data recorder
  • Point-to-Point video uplink / downlink
  • Tactical Mission Computer, including Data Link
  • Active dipping sonar and sonobuoy dispensing
  • Helmet Mounted Display with optional tracker
  • Integrated Defensive Aids Suite, including missile, laser, radar warning, active countermeasures.

Source leonardocompany.com

Weapons onboard HH-101A Caesar helicopter

The HH-101A Caesar helicopter is fitted with three M134 7.62mm pintle-mounted Gatling-type machine guns on both sides as well as on the rear ramp.

3 x M134 7.62mm pintle-mounted Gatling-type machine guns

1416667619_03-chinook_gal4M134 7.62mm pintle-mounted Gatling-type machine guns
DESIGNATION
(SEE NOTE 2)
Army – M134D
Air Force – GAU-2B/A
Navy – GAU-17/A
SHIP CLASS USED ON Many
DATE OF DESIGN about 1963
DATE IN SERVICE 1965
GUN WEIGHT 35 lbs. (16 kg)
GUN LENGTH OA 29.5 in (75 cm) including suppressor
Barrels are 22 in (55.9 cm) long
BORE LENGTH N/A
RIFLING LENGTH 20 in (50.8 cm)
GROOVES 4
LANDS N/A
TWIST Uniform RH 1 in 33.333
CHAMBER VOLUME N/A
RATE OF FIRE
(SEE NOTE 3)
2,000 to 4,000 rounds per minute
  1. Barrel cluster rotates counterclockwise as viewed from the breech end.
  2. M134D is the minigun itself. Other designations are usually for the “gun assemblies” that include the mounting. The GAUSE designation appears only on text released with U.S. Navy photographs. It may represent a “sailor-alt” rather than an official U.S. Navy designation, although I have been unable to confirm that one way or the other. I have been told by USN personnel that the “SE” in GAUSE probably stands for “Shipboard Equipment” and refers to the entire gun and mounting assembly rather than to just the minigun itself.
  3. The original design of the 1960s had a fixed rate of about 6,000 rounds per minute. This was unsustainable over any period of time and the weapon was redesigned to add a transmission housing at the motor, giving the weapon a variable speed of 2,000 or 4,000 rounds per minute. On the newer Dillon Aero Inc. version, the rate of fire is determined by the gun drive unit used, with drive units giving either 3,000 or 4,000 rounds per minute available. There is no speed selection on this version other than by assembling a different gun drive motor to the the gun system assembly. The 3,000 ROF drive motor takes 0.5 seconds to spin up to speed and 0.25 seconds to spin down to stop. When the trigger is released, there is a delay until all six barrels have been cleared by fire. This ensures that no live ammunition is left in the firing chambers, thus eliminating cook-off problems. Source navweaps.com
airrecognition.com
  • Armoured protection in cockpit, cabin and seats
  • Anti-ship missiles and torpedoes
  • Crew Served Weapons (3 x 12.7mm/7.62mm machine guns)
  • Multi-purpose rocket / cannon pods
  • Air to air missiles
  • Air to surface missiles

Source leonardocompany.com

Countermeasures

An integrated electronic warfare system is installed to provide self-protection against radar, laser and infrared threats. It also protects the machine gun operators and the critical systems from ballistic threats. The cockpit seats are armoured to provide additional protection for the crew.

The helicopter also features large aircraft infrared countermeasures (LAIRCM), direct-attached storage (DAS), and directional infrared countermeasures (DIRCM).

In June 2011, Elbit Systems was awarded a contract worth $15m by Elettronica for the supply of ELT/572 DIRCM system for the HH-101A Caesar.

Elbit Systems Ltd. (NASDAQ and TASE: ESLT) (“Elbit Systems”), announced today, at the Paris Air Show, that it was awarded a contract valued in excess of $15 million by Elettronica S.p.A (“Elettronica”) to participate in a program to supply the ELT/572 DIRCM (Directed Infra-Red Countermeasures) system for installation on various platforms of the Italian Air Force, including the C130J, C27J and AW101. The contract will be performed over the next three years.

Based on Elbit Systems Electro-Optics Elop Ltd. (“Elop”) MUSIC® system, ELT/572 was jointly funded by Elettronica and Elop under a cooperation agreement between the companies.

MUSIC® is based on advanced fiber laser technology and counters MANPADS (man portable air defense systems) by emitting a laser beam towards an approaching missile causing the missile to veer off course.

Adi Dar, Elop’s General Manager, commented: “We are extremely pleased with our cooperation with Elettronica on DIRCM that has resulted in this initial contract for the Italian Air Force. The threat of MANPADS to military cargo planes, tankers and helicopters, as well as commercial aviation is increasing, and our family of DIRCM systems provides effective protection to the aircraft”. Source armyrecognition.com

Engine and performance

screenshot-www.youtube.com-2018.06.10-11-03-41Lublin Spotters

Powered by three civil-certified GE CT7-8E engines, the helicopter can reach a maximum cruise speed of 277kmph and a maximum range of 1,363km. Each engine has a take-off power of 1,884kW and a maximum continuous power of 1,522kW.

3 x GE CT7-8E engines

GE CT7-8E engines

Comparison

CT7-2 CT7-6/6A CT7-8 CT7-9
Physical Information
Compressor Stages 6 6 6 6
Low-Pressure Turbine / High-Pressure Turbine 2/2 2/2 2/2 2/2
Nominal Diameter (Inches) 15.6 15.6 26 29
Length (Inches) 46 47 48.8 96
Power Specifications
Take off rating at Sea Level 1,625 2,000 2,634 1,870-1,950
SFC at take-off rating 0.474 0.454 0.452 0.455

Source geaviation.com

The helicopter has a standard internal fuel capacity of 5,135l, and carries 649l in a small USG auxiliary fuel tank and up to 1,389l in a large USG auxiliary fuel tank.

The aircraft has rate of climb of 8.5m/s, a service ceiling of 4,570m and a hovering IGE of 3,307m. It can endure for six hours and 50 minutes, when powered by two engines.

Main materail source airforce-technology.com

Technical Data

Engine Rating (3 x CT7-8E)
Take-Off power (5 min)

3 x 1,884

kW

3 x 2,527

shp

Intermediate (30 min)

3 x 1,855

kW

3 x 2,488

shp

Maximum Continuous Power

3 x 1,522

kW

3 x 2,041

shp

OEI 2 Minute Rating

2 x 1,880

kW

2 x 2,522

shp

Fuel Capacity 
Standard Internal Fuel Tanks

4,108

kg

9,058

lb

Small Auxiliary Fuel Tank 519 kg 1,145 lb
Large Auxiliary Fuel Tank 1,111 kg 2,450 lb
Crew
Pilot

2

Passengers

25+ crashworthy

External Dimensions
Length overall

22,83

m

74,11

ft

Overall height

6,66

m

21,10

ft

Rotor diameter

18.60

m

61,00

ft

Performance (MGW-ISA)
Max Cruise speed (SL-MCP

277

km/h

150

kt

Hovering IGE

3,307

m

10,850

ft

Max Range (All Engine Cruise)*

1,363

km

735

nm

Max Range (Twin Engine Cruise)* 1,500 km 810 nm
Max Endurance (Twin Engine Cruise)*

6 h 50 min

*Utility version, no reserves, standard fuel tanks, 6,000 ft cruise

Specification leonardocompany.com

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8 thoughts on “HH-101A Caesar Medium-Lift Helicopter, Italy

  1. Pierpaolo MAGLIO

    I also found some of my own photos published in this article, without my authorization in clear violation of international copyrights rules, you removed one of mine (I had already saved the screen shot) but the cockpit photo is still mine and under my own copyright, hobby or business makes no difference, on the web you have to respect copyrights!

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    Reply
    1. nonothai Post author

      Please notify which photos belong to you I will remove it.
      From what I understand usage of photos are allowed if used for educational purposes. Thank you

      Like

      Reply
      1. Pierpaolo MAGLIO

        the photo of the cockpit with switch on instrument is also mine and still visible, the use of photos for educational purposed is allowed by a US law, this law does not apply the the whole world, not in Europe and not in Italy. Photos belong to authors and you must consider how difficult and expensive is for us to shot military aircraft!

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      2. nonothai Post author

        Thank you I have removed all photos and I apologize. I understand your point of view and I did not intentionally try to cause harm.

        Like

  2. CLAUDIO TOSELLI

    you are fools …. you have removed the photos without even apologizing. ATTENTION I HAVE THE PREVIOUS COPY WITH THE STOLEN PHOTOS. ATTENTION YOU DO NOT NEVER PURCHASE TO USE MY PHOTOS FOR YOUR SMALL AND UNNECESSARY REPORTS. UNDERSTAND!!!!!!

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    Reply
  3. CLAUDIO TOSELLI

    Observing IN iNTERNET the report on the Italian helicopter HH-101A I saw one or more ‘MY PHOTOS published WITHOUT MY AUTHORIZATION AND SHOOTED BY OTHER WEBSITES ON THE INTERNET. I WOULD LIKE TO EXPLORE THE IMMEDIATE PAYMENT OF THE IMAGES OTHERWISE I WILL RESERVE IN INTERNATIONAL ATTORNEY
    FROM THIS TIME I DEFY YOU TO PUBLISH OTHER MY IMAGES WITH MY COPYRIGHT
    FOR THIS / THESE PHOTOS STOLEN I DEMAND THE SUM OF EURO 100.00 EACH WILL SEND MY PAYMENT DATA AFTER YOUR REPLY
    i WAIT IMMEDIATELY YOUR JUSTIFICATION TO THIS ACTION BECAUSE IT IS COMFORTABLE TO WRITE A REPORTAGE WITH PHOTOS STOLEN TO OTHERS
    CLAUDIO TOSELLI

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