Israeli Ministry of Defense unveils its new Eitan 8×8 APC armoured vehicle personnel carrier


Published: Monday, 01 August 2016 16:53

Today, August 1, 2016, the Israeli Ministry of Defense (MoD) has unveiled a new 8×8 armoured vehicle personnel carrier (APC) called Eitan. According the Israeli MoD, the vehicle will replace the old tracked armoured personnel carrier M113 in service with the Israeli army since many years.

Eitan_8x8_APC_wheeled_armoured_vehicle_personnel_carrier_Israel_Israeli_army_defense_industry_640_001The new Israeli-made Eitan 8×8 APC armoured vehicle personnel carrier
The new Eitan has a weight from 30,000 to 35,000 kg and can carry a total of 12 military personnel including commander, driver and gunner. The vehicle will be fitted with a new generation of active protection system based on the Trophy Active Protection System developed by the Israeli Defense Company Rafael to counter RPG and modern anti-tank missile threats.

Brigadier General Baruch Matzliah, head of the Ministry’s Tank Production Office, said ” The Eitan was developed from the experience of Israeli troop during the Israel-Gaza conflict 2014 and the Operation Protective Edge”. “This new vehicle will join the fleet of Namer tracked armoured vehicle personnel carrier to offer one of the most advanced, protected wheeled combat vehicle.”, he added.

Israeli MOD, said that the Tank Production Office and the Israeli Ground Forces command have just started field tests to control the performances of the vehicle in various conditions.

The Eitan is motorized with a 750 horsepower engine and will be able to reach a 90 km/h road speed. The vehicle will be fitted with an unmanned turret armed with an automatic cannon of 30 or 40 mm.

As many other armies in the world, IDF (Israel Defense Forces) have make the choice to use wheeled armoured vehicle which offers more mobility with a ground pressure considerably higher than that of their tracked armoured counterparts. Modern wheeled combat vehicle also can offer the same level of firepower of main battle tank, as the Italian Centauro which can be armed with a 120mm gun.


Israel Develops a Highly Protected APC to Replace Thousands of M-113 ‘Tin Cans’


The Israeli prototype is based on a proven automotive system, with an operationally proven powertrain that has been adopted by several armed forces in Europe. According to the head of Mantak, Brig. General Baruch Mazliah, using commercially available automotive components enabled the designers to develop an APC that will cost half as the tracked Namer, and less than similar wheeled APCs available in the world market. The hull was developed in the country, along with the weapon systems, survivability and protection systems used. According to Mazliah, the need for a wheeled armored vehicle such as Eitan evolved from lessons learned in recent combat operations in Gaza. The Eitan complements the Merkava and Namer, as it can transport infantry squads on roads, without relying on tank transporters. Eitan has a maximum road speed of +90 km/h (56 mp/h).

Similar to Merkava and Namer, Eitan does not rely only on ballistic armor for protection but uses a combination of survivability systems for to enhance the survival of the crew, passengers, and the entire vehicle. Designed for a gross vehicle weight of up to 35 tons (77,000 pounds), Eitan provides sufficient base protection for common battlefield threats. Using the Trophy Active Protection Systems (APS), the vehicle can effectively avoid high-level threats without proportionally increasing the weight of its armor. To protect the occupants from blast effects, of mines and IEDs, Eitan has been designed with protected, relatively high floor. The passive protection provided by modular armor is applied to the vehicle’s front and sides, while equipment modules add to its security. The vehicle will be initially produced at the Israel MOD AFV plant, at an annual production rate of several dozens of vehicles, as is the case with the Namer ICV.


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