Daily Archives: January 6, 2017

China confirms it has received Su-35 fighter jets but noted that it might be the last combat plane China would import

Air Force receives 4 of Russia’s latest fighters

China Daily, January 6, 2017

The Chinese military has confirmed that it received four Russian-made Sukhoi Su-35 fighter jets in late December, but noted that the Su-35 might be the last combat plane China would import thanks to its own defense advances.

The People’s Liberation Army’s website, 81.cn, recently said that with the commissioning of the J-20, China’s domestically developed stealth fighter, Russia understood that the Su-35 “will lose its value on the Chinese market in the near future”, so was eager to complete the Su-35 deal. The Su-35 is Russia’s most advanced fighter jet in use.

The article also takes pride in the PLA no longer needing Russian-made air defense missiles or transport planes because it now has the indigenous, cutting-edge HQ-9B long-range surface-to-air missile and Y-20 strategic transport aircraft.

“Therefore we hope very much that Su-35 will be the last (combat) aircraft China imports,” it said.

This is the first time the Chinese military has confirmed deliveries of the Su-35, though it did not elaborate.

In late December, some Chinese military enthusiasts posted a photograph of what they said was a Su-35 with the PLA Air Force’s colors flying over a military air base in China, sparking a debate on whether deliveries of the aircraft had begun.

Sergey Chemezov, CEO of Rostec, Russia’s state technology corporation, said in November 2015 that Russia and China had signed a contract that was estimated to be worth $2 billion for 24 Su-35s. The deal was later confirmed by Wu Qian, a spokesman for China’s Defense Ministry.

Russian news agency TASS quoted an unnamed source within Russia’s international military-technical cooperation system as reporting in mid-December that the first deliveries of the aircraft were scheduled in 2017, but “eventually a decision was made to speed up the process and to provide the first batch in the last days” of 2016.

The Su-35 has engines that can point in different directions for increased maneuverability, and phased array antenna radar, which provides better performance against stealth aircraft. It has a maximum speed of 2,500 km/h and can fly 3,400 km without refueling, according to TASS. The fighter is armed with a 30 mm gun and can carry 12 bombs or missiles, the report said.

China bought a large number of Su-27 and Su-30 multirole fighter jets from Russia in the 1990s and early 2000s. China also has built licensed variants. These Sukhoi planes are a pillar of the PLA Air Force and the PLA Navy’s aviation wing.

Wang Ya’nan, editor-in-chief of Aerospace Knowledge, told China Daily that the Su-35 will help the PLA fill the gap before it has enough J-20s. He said the new addition will also facilitate China’s efforts to upgrade its current Sukhoi jets.

Original post china.org.cn

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The article also takes pride in the PLA no longer needing Russian-made air defense missiles or transport planes because it now has the indigenous, cutting-edge HQ-9B long-range surface-to-air missile and Y-20 strategic transport aircraft.

Well China have ordered the S400 and I guess they will be reverse engineering the Su-35 TVC technology and S400…

Sukhoi Su-35: Details

Chengdu J-20: Details

j-20a_lrip_-_9.7.16_-_1

UK signs contract for upgrades, maintenance, and repair services on A400m

U.K. Defense Ministry signs off on Atlas A400M upgrade deal

By Ryan Maass   |   Jan. 5, 2017 at 3:08 PM

LONDON, Jan. 5 (UPI) — Britain’s Ministry of Defense has completed negotiating a $509 million contract with Airbus to support production for the Atlas A400M airlifter.

Currently, the Royal Air Force has 14 A400M aircraft in service. Defense officials plan to add an additional 8 by 2019. The new contract, defense officials say, secures a key part of the force’s fleet until 2026.

“The U.K.’s future armed forces will be prepared to respond quickly to global developments and the delivery of next-generation aircraft such as Atlas is vital to the fulfillment of this vision,” U.K. Defense Equipment and Support chief Tony Douglas said in a press release.

Douglas went on to add the agreement, which covers upgrades, maintenance, and repair services, will also bolster cooperation between the British government and its international industry partners.

“This key contract will deliver maintenance for our A400M Atlas fleet, enabling this class-leading aircraft to support U.K. military operations around the globe,” Chief of Materiel Air Marshal Julian young added.

Six European countries are involved with the production of the A400M, which is capable of carrying a payload of 25 tons and fly at a range of over 2,000 nautical miles. The planes are designed to perform military airlift roles such as carrying armored vehicles and personnel, but are also fitted for humanitarian missions.

Original post upi.com

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“This key contract will deliver maintenance for our A400M Atlas fleet, enabling this class-leading aircraft to support U.K. military operations around the globe,”

A400M Military Transport: Details

RAF Atlas (Airbus A400M) ZM400 'City of Bristol' taking off at RAF Brize Norton. BZN-OFFICIAL-20150205-131-008 Mr Paul Crouch is a civilian contractor photographer employed by Serco and permanently based at RAF Brize Norton, Oxfordshire. He previously completed 22 years as a RAF Photographer from 1984 at AIDU RAF Northolt, RAF Laarbruch, Germany, AIDU RAF Northolt, RAF Manston, AIDU RAF Northolt, 41 Sqn RIC RAF Coltishall and JADTEU RAF Brize Norton as well as detachments to the Falklands, Gioia del Colle, Italy and South Wales as a ‘Green Goddess’ driver during the fire-fighter’s strike and then ‘retired’ in 2006. After working in the commercial photographic sector for two years he was then employed by Serco to work as a civilian contractor in the photographic section at RAF Lyneham where he was often called upon to photograph the repatriation ceremonies of service personnel from Afghanistan. He was made redundant by Serco when RAF Lyneham closed in March 2012 but he was then re-employed by Serco to work at RAF Brize Norton in a similar role.