Raytheon AN/MPQ-65 radar

“We’re bringing Raytheon’s GaN-based AESA radar to AUSA so current and future Patriot customers, decision-makers and thought leaders can see first-hand Raytheon’s vision for the future of lower-tier air and missile defense,” said Ralph Acaba, vice president of Integrated Air and Missile Defense at Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems business. “This milestone confirms that Raytheon can rapidly design, build, test and deliver a GaN-based AESA radar capable of defeating all threats.”

Raytheon’s GaN-based AESA main array is a critical step on the path to a GaN-based AESA radar with full 360-degree capability.  In 2015, Raytheon demonstrated 360-degree capability with its GaN-based AESA pilot array.  The new main AESA array is a bolt-on replacement for the current antenna, measuring roughly 9′ wide x 13′ tall and oriented toward the primary threat.

“Raytheon believes the GaN-based AESA radar is the next logical upgrade to keep Patriot ahead of emerging threats,” said Tim Glaeser, vice president of Integrated Air and Missile Defense Business Development at Raytheon’s Integrated Defense Systems business.  “Patriot was designed to be continually upgraded, so in addition to AESA GaN technology, Raytheon has a robust, company-funded research and development pipeline which will ensure Patriot outpaces the evolving threat, even 20 to 30 years from now.”

Raytheon’s re-engineered Patriot radar prototype uses two key technologies – active electronically scanned array, which changes the way the radar searches the sky; and gallium nitride circuitry, which uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar’s high-power radio frequencies

Raytheon’s GaN-based AESA Patriot radar will work with future open architecture such as the Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System. It retains backwards compatibility with the current Patriot Engagement Control Station and is fully interoperable with NATO.

The current Patriot radar uses a passive electronic scanning array radar. An AESA radar changes the way the Patriot radar searches the sky. Instead of shining a powerful, single transmitter through many lenses, the new array uses many smaller transmitters, each with its own control. The result is a system that is not only more flexible, with an adjustable beam for many different missions, but also more reliable; it still works even if some of the transmitters do not. SOURCE Raytheon Company

Patriot upgrade

A pair of power-ups

The Patriot upgrade draws its power from two key technologies.

  • Active Electronically Scanned Array — This changes the way the Patriot radar searches the sky. Instead of shining a powerful, single transmitter through many lenses, the new array uses many smaller transmitters, each with its own control. The result is a system that is not only more flexible, with an adjustable beam for many different missions, but also more reliable; it still works even if some of the transmitters do not.
  • Gallium Nitride: This is the material used to build the radar’s powerful new circuits. It is a powerful semiconductor that uses energy efficiently to amplify the radar’s high-power radio frequencies. Raytheon has spent more than 15 years and $200 million pioneering gallium nitride technology, and has built gallium nitride circuits for a number of products including jammers and other radars.

Eyes all around

The full-size radar is an important step on a path toward a Patriot system that can simultaneously see all 360 degrees of the battlefield.

Raytheon has designed a 360-degree radar that fits into the current configuration of the Patriot system. It includes the main array facing front and two smaller “quarter-panel” arrays facing the rear. Early testing of the design at Raytheon’s radar range in New Hampshire has been successful.

Image @photos.prnewswire.com

The AN/MPQ-65 (PAC-3) is an operating in C-Band passive electronically scannedphased array radar mounted on M860 semi-trailers. Under the Patriot PAC-3 program the AN/MPQ-53 radar set has been replaced with the AN/MPQ-65.  Source radartutorial.eu

General data:
Type: Radar Altitude Max: 0 m
Range Max: 166.7 km Altitude Min: 0 m
Range Min: 0.2 km Generation: Early 2000s
Properties: Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) [Side Info], Continous Tracking Capability [Phased Array Radar], Pulse Doppler Radar (Full LDSD Capability), Interrupted Continuous Wave Illumination
Sensors / EW:
AN/MPQ-65 – (AN/MPQ-53(V) PAC-3) Radar
Role: Radar, FCR, Surface-to-Air, Medium-Range
Max Range: 166.7 km

Source cmano-db.com

What makes that design possible is gallium nitride’s efficiency; with a traditional semiconductor, the same idea would require more parts and a much larger footprint. That would not only be harder to operate and maintain, but it would cost more too.

Always improving

The new array is powerful, with the potential for even greater advances, but it remains true to the Patriot legacy — and can even be integrated into any of the more than 220 already-fielded systems that are owned by 13 countries around the world.

“Those years of experience are still captured in this radar, in this system as a whole,” said Theresa Avino-Manning, who led the team that produced the radar Raytheon will bring to the AUSA symposium. “We’ve upgraded all those parts, so we could take advantage of modern technology while still living within the tried-and-true footprint and operational system of Patriot.” Source raytheon.com

Raytheon – Patriot Air & Missile Defense System Evolution

arronlee33 

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