F-15K Slam Eagle

The F-15K Slam Eagle is a multi-role fighter aircraft manufactured by Boeing for the Republic of Korea Air Force (ROKAF). It is an advanced variant of the F-15E Strike Eagle fighter. It can conduct long-range precision strike missions during day or night, in all weather conditions.

F-15E ‘Strike’ Eagle: Details

USAF F-15E – theaviationist.com

The F-15K is equipped with state-of-the-art mission equipment to conduct air-to-ground, air-to-air, and air-to-sea missions.

The ROKAF selected the F-15K Slam Eagle for its Next Generation Fighter Programme in April 2002. The aircraft made its first flight in March 2005. The first aircraft was rolled out from the Boeing site in St. Louis the same month.

Burner Friday: Boeing F-15K SLAM Eagle

Burner Friday: Boeing F-15K SLAM EagleF-15K – fightersweep.com

The SLAM Eagle. It just sounds badass, and one look at this jet will convey that it is badass, indeed. The F-15K is a multi-role fighter aircraft manufactured by Boeing for the Republic of Korea Air Force. It is an advanced variant of the F-15E Strike Eagle fielded by the USAF and, like its predecessor, it can conduct day/night long-range precision strike missions, in all weather conditions.

Equipped with state-of-the-art mission equipment to conduct air-to-ground, air-to-air, and air-to-sea missions, the F-15K has several features not typically found on USAF Strike Eagles. Included is an AAS-42 IRST, a customized Tactical Electronic Warfare Suite (TEWS) to increase jamming effectiveness, and cockpit compatibility with night vision goggles.

The ARC-232 U/VHF radio with Fighter Data Link system is standard, as well as the advanced APG-63(V)1 radar. The radar incorporates the air-to-air and air-to-ground modes of the APG-70 radar on U.S. jets with additional sea-surface searching/tracking, ground-moving target tracking, and enhanced high-resolution ground mapping for long-distance target identification. It allows the jet to engage air, land, and sea-based threats simultaneously.

The F-15K is also equipped with the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System, interfacing the sensors with weapons such as AGM-84K SLAM-ER and JASSM, as well as the standard AIM-9 and AIM-120 air-to-air missile options. The combination of improved avionics and sensors, as well as advanced weaponry, make the SLAM Eagle a vicious, lethal platform. Source fightersweep.com

F-15E1

F-15K orders and deliveries

“The F-15K is equipped with state-of-the-art mission equipment to conduct air-to-ground, air-to-air, and air-to-sea missions.”

The ROKAF placed a $4.2bn contract with Boeing for 40 F-15K Slam Eagle fighter jets, in June 2002. The first two F-15Ks were delivered to Korea at the Seoul Air Show in October 2005. The 40th F-15K aircraft was delivered during the Red Flag exercise at Nellis Air Force Base in August 2008. All deliveries under the contract were officially concluded in October 2008.

BAE Systems Awarded F-15k IFF Contract

In 2002 BAE Systems received initial funding from the Boeing company to produce advanced Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) systems for the Republic of Korea’s new fighter aircraft – the F-15K. 

Under the contract with Boeing, valued at more than $9 million, BAE Systems Advanced Systems business unit at Greenlawn will develop and build as many as 40 AN/APX-113 Combined Interrogator Transponder (CIT) systems plus spares, and provide associated data and units for lab testing. 

The IFF transponders allow the military to rapidly identify its own friendly aircraft from enemy or potentially hostile aircraft. Source defense-aerospace.com

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The aircraft’s service life is planned through 2040, with technology insertions and upgrades throughout its life cycle.

The F-15K became the first Eagle variant to release a SLAM-ER standoff weapon on 27 March 2006. The firing was made at Point Mugu, California, at 25000 ft and Mach 0.8, around 180 km (100 nm) from the target.

The last airframe of the first batch (of 40 airframes) has been delivered as agreed on 8th October 2008, during the Seoul Air Show. One airframe has been crashed due to pilot error (the pilot blacked out during a high-G maneuver) on 6th August 2006. The F-15K left Daegu Air Base at 19:42. The aircraft discharged simulated air-to-air weapons at 20:11 but, while manoeuvring to respond to an opponent’s attack, the crew sent a “knock it off” signal at an altitude of 11,000ft – the aircraft crashing 16 seconds later, at 20:12:19. Source f-15e.info

In April 2008, Boeing received a contract to deliver 21 F-15K aircraft to ROKAF under Next Fighter II programme. Boeing delivered the first six of 21 F-15Ks in 2010. Two more aircraft were delivered in April 2011. The ninth and tenth aircraft were delivered in June 2011. All the deliveries were concluded with the handover of final two aircraft to the ROKAF at Daegu Air Base in April 2012.

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Second batch of 21 F-15Ks

Not much before the completion of the first batch deliveries, the Korean government announced on 25th April 2008 that a second batch of 21 F-15Ks, worth 2.3 billion USD, was ordered (this second batch would have originally contained 20 airframes, but it was increased by one to compensate for the airframe lost in 2006). The delivery was scheduled between 2010 and 2012. Unlike the first batch of F-15Ks, this second batch will be powered by Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 engines. 46 engines will be built by Samsung Techwin under license. South Korea added that P&W engines have commonality with its KF-16’s. It is a bit unusual to have different types of engines for the same aircraft type, but Pratt & Whitney offered better pricing, part production sharing, and warranty options.

The first jet of this second batch (produced by Boeing under the Next Fighter II contract), airframe F-15K41 completed its first flight on 22 April 2010. Batch 2 deliveries were performed in the following schedule:

  • 6 airframes (F-15K41 through F-15K46) delivered in 2010.
  • 2 airframes (F-15K47 and F-15K48) delivered at Daegu Air Base on Mar 15, 2011.
  • 2 airframes (F-15K49 and F-15K50) delivered at Daegu Air Base on May 31, 2011.
  • 3 airframes (F-15K51 through F-15K53) delivered at Daegu Air Base on Aug 20, 2011.
  • 3 airframes(F-15K54 through F-15K56) delivered in January, 2012.
  • 3 airframes (F-15K57 through F-15K59) delivered at Daegu Air Base in March, 2012.*
  • 2 airframes (F-15K60 and F-15K61 delivered at Daegu Air Base on Apr 2, 2012.
* Note that airframes F-15K57 through F-15K59 rolled off from the assembly line in January 2012. After having participated in Red Flag 2012 they were flown back to St. Louis and after a few modifications they were delivered “officially” to South Korea in March 2012.

With this, Boeing completed all deliveries on-schedule and on-cost. Fleet service life is planned through 2040.

In 2011 the Slam Eagles received the Sniper targeting pod as well. After Lockheed Martin demonstrated the benefits of Sniper pod’s capability for ROKAF by successfully flying Sniper on the F-15K and the KF-16 aircraft with a common Sniper pod software load in 2009, the first pods arrived to Daegu Air Base on Apr 18, 2011Source f-15e.info

Sniper targeting pod

Mission

Sniper pods provide improved long-range target detection/identification and continuous stabilized surveillance for all missions, including close air support of ground forces. The Sniper pod enables aircrews to detect and identify weapon caches and individuals carrying armaments, all outside jet noise ranges. Superior imagery, a video datalink and J-series-weapons-quality coordinates provided by the Sniper pod enable rapid target decisions and keep aircrews out of threat ranges.

High resolution imagery for non-traditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (NTISR) enables the Sniper pod to play a major role in Air Force operations in theater, providing top cover for ground forces, as well as increasing the safety of civilian populations.

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Features

Sniper pods include a high definition mid-wave forward looking infrared (FLIR), dual-mode laser, HDTV, laser spot tracker, laser marker, video data link, and a digital data recorder. Advanced image processing algorithms, combined with rock steady stabilization techniques, provide cutting-edge performance. The pod features automatic tracking and laser designation of tactical size targets via real-time imagery presented on cockpit displays. The Sniper pod is fully compatible with the latest J-series munitions for precision weapons delivery against multiple moving and fixed targets.

USAF-Sniper_XR_pod_13.jpg

Advanced Targeting Pod – Sensor Enhancement (ATP-SE) design upgrades include enhanced sensors, advanced processors, and automated NTISR modes.

The Sniper pod’s architecture and modular design permits true two-level maintenance, eliminating costly intermediate-level support. Automated built-in test permits flightline maintainers to isolate and replace an LRU in under 20 minutes. Spares are ordered through a user-friendly website offering in-transit visibility to parts shipment.

The Sniper pod’s modular design also offers an affordable road map for modernizing and enhancing precision targeting capabilities for U.S. Air Force and coalition partner aircraft.

General characteristics
Primary function: positive identification, automatic tracking and laser designation, NTISR
Prime contractor: Lockheed Martin
Length: 98.2 inches (252 centimeters)
Diameter: 11.9 inches (30 centimeters)
Weight: 446 pounds (202 kilograms)
Aircraft: F-15E, F-16 Block 30/40/50, A-10, B-1
Sensors: high resolution FLIR and HDTV, dual mode laser designator, laser spot tracker and laser marker  
Date deployed: January 2005

Source af.mil

“Tiger Eyes” AAS-42 Infra-red search and track

F-15K.jpgAAS-42 Infra-red search and track mounted on pylon with Sniper targeting pod of F-15K

Sensors: The F-15K received improved LANTRIN pods. The AAQ-14 pod features a new 3rd generation FLIR sensor which Boeing calls as “Tiger Eyes”. The pod gives the Slam Eagle IRST capabilities in air-to-air engagements.

Lockheed Martin’s IRST is a development of the AN/AAS-42 system that was originally carried by Northrop Grumman F-14D Tomcats. However, it has been undergoing development since then, first for the abortive pod-mounted system for the F-15 Eagle, and now further refined for the Super Hornet application. Source ainonline.com

irstaas42F-14D AAS-42 – sistemasdearmas.com.br

The TIGER Eyes is an advanced electro-optical sensor suite that will provide targeting, all-weather navigation, terrain-following and Infrared Search and Track (IRST) for the F-15K multirole fighter. TIGER Eyes is an evolution of combat-proven LANTIRN and US Navy IRST technology.

The TIGER Eyes sensor suite includes a mid-wave FLIR, terrain-following radar, 40,000 feet altitude laser, CCD-TV, and a long-range IRST. It will enable release of air-to-surface weapons at the longer ranges available for those weapons today. The system’s IRST, similar to the F-14-mounted IRST, will enable the F-15K to engage passively, long range airborne targets without using the radar system.

In April 2006 Boeing selected Lockheed Martin to provide Sniper Advanced targeting pods, Tiger Eyes navigation pods, and an Infrared Search and Track (IRST) System for the Republic of Singapore F-15SGs. Under an undisclosed fixed-price five-year contract this advanced electro-optical sensor suite will be integrated into the F-15SG aircraft beginning in the second quarter of 2007. Source deagel.com

Properties: Pod – Night Navigation/Attack (Incl. Bomb, Rocket Delivery)
Sensors / EW:
AN/AAS-42 – Infrared
IRST, Imaging Infrared Seach and Track
Max Range: 185.2 km
Weapons:
Tiger Eyes Pod [IRST] – (LANTIRN Gen 3, Sniper XP Pylon) Sensor Pod
Properties: Pod – Terrain Following (Land: 200ft [60.9m], Sea: 100ft [30.5m]), Pod – Night Navigation/Attack (Incl. Bomb, Rocket Delivery)
Sensors / EW:
Tiger Eyes [TFR] – Radar
TFR, Terrain Following Radar
Max Range: 3.7 km
Tiger Eyes [FLIR] – Infrared
Infrared, Attack Camera
Max Range: 111.1 km
Tiger Eyes [CCD] – Visual
LLTV, Attack
Max Range: 55.6 km
Weapons:
Tiger Eyes Pod [FLIR, CCD TV + TFR] – (LANTIRN Gen 3) Sensor Pod

Lockheed Martin LANTIRN navigation and targeting system

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LANTIRN Extended Range (ER) navigation and targeting pods provide today’s warfighter with enhanced range, resolution and reliability delivering multi-mission success with a low cost of ownership. LANTIRN ER allows aircrews to operate, in daylight or darkness, at mission altitudes from sea level to 40,000 feet, all with outstanding targeting performance.  LANTIRN ER, which is the latest LANTIRN production configuration, is offered as a newly fabricated pod, or as an upgrade to existing pods. Source lockheedmartin.com

The FLIR imagery, for terrain following, avoidance and navigation, is generated by a wide field of view FLIR sensor, sensor, mounted in the port LANTIRN navigation pod, together with the terrain following radar (TFR). The second LANTIRN pod, starboard mounted, is termed the targeting pod. It contains a narrow field of view FLIR sensor, boresighted with a laser rangefinder/designator and importantly, in its later versions, an automatic target recogniser. Source ausairpower.net

The FLIR imagery, for terrain following, avoidance and navigation, is generated by a wide field of view FLIR sensor, sensor, mounted in the port LANTIRN navigation pod, together with the terrain following radar (TFR). The TFR is an advanced digital system which automatically controls its power output, both in direction and time (it will build up a terrain profile in its memory, store it, switch off and turn on again only when necessary to rebuild the profile), is frequency agile and can be configured for ground mapping. The frequency agility and silent on/off operation make it very difficult to detect. The second LANTIRN pod, starboard mounted, is termed the targeting pod. It contains a narrow field of view FLIR sensor, boresighted with a laser rangefinder/designator and importantly, in its later versions, an automatic target recogniser. Source ausairpower.net

LANTIRN Extended Range (ER) navigation F-15K  – Mu Yeol Lee

LANTIRN stands for Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared for Night. This system consists of two pods hung under the air intakes – the AN/AAQ-13 navigation pod under the right intake and the AN/AAQ-14 targeting pod under the left intake. Since LANTIRN pods are in use with other platforms (A-10, F-16) where they have other hanging points, adaptor units are needed to fix them on the F-15E. The adaptor units are the ADU-576/A for the navigation pod and ADU-577/A for the targeting pod. This is the only place on the F-15E for them and they cannot be exchanged. Although both of the pods are capable of working alone, most of the time they come in pair, an F-15E with only one LANTIRN pod is a rare sight. Source f-15e.info

 The Tiger Eyes system is comprised of two pods: the Lockheed Martin IRST (top pod) and a standard LANTIRN pod (bottom pod) 

Cockpit

S Korean F-15K_s

The glass cockpit of the F-15K accommodates two crew members including a pilot and a weapon systems officer (WSO). The cockpit display suite from Kaiser Electronics integrates three flat panel colour displays, four multi-purpose displays, two upfront control panels, a wide field of view head-up display (HUD), and a joint helmet mounted cueing system (JHMCS).

F-15K Pilot stationF15K5F-15K WSO station
F-15K  – Mu Yeol Lee

F-15 ACES II 

The F-15 Eagle is equipped with this version of the ACES II. It replaced an Escapac seat used in the prototypes and early aircraft. This version differs from the rest of the basic side-pull ACES II seats (A-10, F-117) in the configuration of the headrest canopy breakers, and the side-pull handles. The picture below shows the size difference between the handles on the A-10 (right) and the F-15 (left). The A-10 seats originally had no canopy breakers as in the example shown, but were later fit with a single canopy breaker. The F-117 has a metal canopy frame which precludes the use of a canopy breaker. The handles on the F-117 closely resemble the A-10 handles. Source ejectionsite.com

F-15 Eagle Losses & Ejections: Here

Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS)

In an air-to-air role, the JHMCS, combined with the AIM-9X missile, form the High-Off-BoreSight (HOBS) system. HOBS is an airborne weapon-interception system that enables pilots to accurately direct or “cue” onboard weapons against enemy aircraft merely by pointing their heads at the targets to guide the weapons, while performing high-G aircraft maneuvers that may be required to complete the attack.

In an air-to-ground role, the JHMCS is used in conjunction with targeting sensors (radar, FLIR, etc.) and “smart weapons” to accurately and precisely attack surface targets. It allows F-15E aircrew to provide unparalleled support to ground troops in the CAS environment.

In all roles, the JHMCS provides the pilot with aircraft performance, targeting, weaponry and threat warning information, regardless of where the pilot is looking, significantly enhancing pilot situation awareness throughout the mission. In a dual-seat aircraft, each crewmember can wear a JHMCShelmet, perform operations independent of each other, and have continuous awareness of where the other crewmember is looking.

System Features

Unlike one of its predecessor, the DASH system, which is integrated into the helmet itself, JHMCS is a clip-on attachment unit, which can be latched into position with one hand during flight (see photo below). It fits to modified HGU-55/P, HGU-56/P or HGU-68/P helmets and it features a newer, faster digital processing package than that used in the DASH. The overall design is more advanced than DASH, based on the collective knowledge accumulated by Elbit and Kaiser through the years.

hmcs

The JHMCS has a magnetic helmet-mounted tracker (like DASH), which determines where the pilot’s head is pointed, combined with a miniature display system that projects information onto the pilot’s visor. A magnetic transmitter unit is fixed to the pilot’s seat and a magnetic field probe is mounted on the helmet to determine where the helmet is actually pointing. A Helmet Vehicle Interface ( HVI) interacts with the aircraft system bus to provide signal generation for the helmet display. The head tracker and visor display together act as a targeting device that can aim sensors and weapons.

To obtain a variety of information and sensor-based data pilots can refer to the visual display on the inside of the helmet while remaining in a “heads-up” or “outside” position during combat; this eliminates the break in visual contact that occurs when they look away to check the display readouts in the cockpit. This significantly improves pilot situational awareness during all mission elements. The visor display presents monochrome calligraphic symbology (stroke display) with information like airspeed, altitude, G-load, AoA, target range, targeting cues, threat warnings, etc. JHMCS provides support for raster scanned imagery to display FLIR or IRST pictures for night operations and provides collimated symbology and imagery to the pilot. JHMCS symbology covers a 20 degree field of view for the right eye, with an 18 mm exit pupil (see photo below).

To aim and fire a missile, pilots simply move their heads to align a targeting cross (placed in the middle of the projected imagery) with the target and press a switch on the flight controls to direct and fire a weapon.

aug_i_ttboeing.com

To attack a ground target, the pilot can acquire the target with a sensor and note it’s location on the helmet display. Alternatively, the pilot can use the helmet display to cue sensors and weapons to a visually detected ground target. Note that precision ordnance cannot be released based on JHMCS targeting alone, the system is not accurate enough for this. However it can be used to direct the aircraft’s much more precise targeting systems (targeting pod) towards the target the pilot is looking at. This way the tedious “soda-straw” search limited to a display image generated by the narrow field of view targeting system can be shortened significatly. With JHMCS, target acquisition can follow a much quicker “look, sharpen, shoot” process.

The system can be used without requiring the aircraft to be maneuvered, significantly reducing the time needed to prosecute an attack, which also minimizes the time spent in the threat environment.

Since targets may be located at high-off-boresight line-of-sight locations in relation to the shooter, the system delivers a short-range intercept envelope that is significantly larger than any other air-to-air weapon in use. When combined with the AIM-9X missile, JHMCS allows effective target designation up to 80 degrees either side of the aircraft’s nose.

The JHMCS display assembly requires two cable connections: a high voltage power cable for operation and a data cable for information exchange with the host aircraft. Unlike in DASH the high voltage power supply is not embedded in the helmet, it feeds up via an umbilical, through a quick disconnect inline high coltage rated connector.

When used in conjunction with a datalink, the system permits handoff of visually detected targets from one aircraft to another, with the second aircraft receiving visual cueing to the target. Source f-15e.info

ARC-232 U/VHF radio

Modes: UHF/VHF, LOS, Have Quick I & II & SATURN
Frequency Range: VHF FM 30-87.975 MHz, VHF AM 108-173.975 MHz, UHF AM/FM 225-399.975 MHz, Guard Receive: 121.5 & 243 MHz with 99 Preset Channels.
Spacing: 8.33kHz & 25 kHz

The AN/ARC-232 (V) 467/468 is a 30 to 400 MHz UHF/VHF multi-band LOS system and is a form-fit replacement for the AN/ARC-164. Features include: VHF/AM/FM, VHF maritime, UHF/AM/FM; SATURN; Have-Quick I/II ECCM; MIL-STD-1533 compatibility; and a panel or remote mount configuration. Options include SINCGARS, 8.33 kHz channel spacing and TDMA in VHF/AM for the FAA. Components available include: C-12623 and C-12624 NVIS radio set controls. Power in watts: AM: 10 & FM: 15.

The AN/ARC-232(V) Starblazer supports the requirement for an airborne, multi-band, multi-mission, anti-jam, voice and data network-capable communication system in one small, light-weight package qualified to military standards. The AN/ARC-232(V) is designed for application and installation on a broad range of fixed and rotary wing aircraft and provides the military VHF and UHF (very high frequency and ultra high frequency) capability required for air defense and close air support. The AN/ARC-232(V) airborne communications system is a form and fit replacement for the AN/ARC-164 family of transceivers. There are both panel and remote mount versions available that are controllable via Military Standard (MIL-STD-1553B) Data Bus, RS-422 or ARINC 429 Interface. Source dpdproductions.com

Weapon systems

The F-15K Slam Eagle accommodates a wide range of weapons and a payload of over 13,000kg for achieving multi-role strike capability.

The aircraft can carry a combination of air-to-air weapons including a 20mm cannon, AIM-9 Sidewinder infrared-guided air-to-air missiles, Raytheon AIM-7 Sparrow radar-guided air-to-air missiles, AIM-120 advanced medium-range air-to-air missile (AMRAAM), and AGM-130 missile.

M-61A1 20mm Gatling gun

M-61A1 20mm Gatling gun

The M61 20mm Vulcan is an externally powered, six-barrel, rotary-fire gun having a rate of fire of up to 7200 spm. The firing rate is selectible at 4,000 spm or 6,000 spm. The gun fires standard electrically primed 20mm ammunition. The M61A1 is hydraulically or ram-air driven, electrically controlled, and uses a linkless ammunition feed system.

Each of the gun’s six barrels fires only once during each revolution of the barrel cluster. The six rotating barrels contribute to long weapon life by minimizing barrel erosion and heat generation. The gun’s rate of fire, essentially 100 rounds per second, gives the pilot a shot density that will enable a “kill” when fired in one-second bursts.

rokaf_f-15k_26_of_72M-61A1 20mm Gatling gun on F-15K – Mu Yeol Lee 

The M61 20mm cannon is a proven gun, having been the US military’s close-in weapon of choice dating back to the 1950s. The F-104, F-105, later models of the F-106, F-111, F-4, B-58, all used the M61, as does the Air Force’s F-15 , F-16 and F-22, and the Navy’s F-14 and F/A-18. The internally mounted 20mm cannon system is common to all versions of the F-15. This system combines the widely used (F-4, F-16, F-18) M61 cannon with 940 rounds (A through D models) or 500 rounds (E model) of ammunition. The cannon can be loaded with target practice, armor piercing, or high explosive incendiary rounds. The primary use of the cannon is in the extremely short range (less than 2000 feet) air-to-air environment, where more sophistacated air-to-air missiles are ineffective. Alternately, the cannon has limited usefulness in a ground strafing role. Source fas.org

AIM-9X Sidewinder 

The AIM-9X missile is the next generation Sidewinder. AIM-9X will provide US and allied nations fighters with the following capabilities: full day/night employment, resistance to countermeasures, extremely high off-boresight acquisition and launch envelopes, enhanced maneuverability and improved target acquisition ranges. One of the main breakthrough of the AIM-9X missile is a thrust vector controlled airframe. AIM-9X carries a contact fuze device and a new IR seeker that will enable, through the JHMCS, high off-boresight engagements. Its digital design architecture will ensure future growth capability.


The AIM-9X missile will be integrated on F-15C/D/E, F/A-18C/D/E/F, F-16s and F/A-22A. No plans have been released about integration of AIM-9X on the F-35. No combat related features of the AIM-9X are its reduced ownership costs, reduced maintainability, high availability and affordability. The US Navy and the US Air Force plan to buy 10,080 missiles. AIM-9X foreign military sales could be 5,000 units according to US government sources. 

Dimensions
Diameter: 130 millimeter (5.12 inch)
Length: 3 meter (118 inch)
Wingspan: 350 millimeter (13.8 inch)
Performance
Max Range: 26,000 meter (14.0 nautical mile)
Speed
Top Speed: 850 mps (3,061 kph)
Weight
Warhead: 10 kilogram (22.0 pound)
Weight: 85 kilogram (187 pound)

Source deagel.com

AIM-9LM infrared-guided Sidewinder

AIM-9L/M Sidewinder air-to-air missiles

The AIM-9L added a more powerful solid-propellant rocket motor as well as tracking maneuvering ability. Improvements in heat sensor and control systems have provided the AIM-9L missile with an all-aspect attack capability and improved guidance characteristics. The L model was the first Sidewinder with the ability to attack from all angles, including head-on. An improved active optical fuze increased the missile’s lethality and resistance to electronic countermeasures. A conical scan seeker increased seeker sensitivity and improved tracking stability. The AIM-9L is configured with an annular blast fragmentation warhead. Production and delivery of the AIM-9L began in 1976.

The AIM-9M missile utilizes a guidance control section with counter-countermeasures and improved maintainability and producibility. The AIM-9M is configured with an annular blast fragmentation warhead. Currently the only operational variant, has the all-aspect capability of the L model, but provides all-around higher performance. The M model has improved defense against infrared countermeasures, enhanced background discrimination capability, and a reduced-smoke rocket motor. These modifications increase ability to locate and lock-on a target and decrease the missile’s chances for detection. Deliveries of the M model began in 1983. Source fas.org

AIM-7F

f823614b6003d8647e47475bd43df90eAIM-7F Sparrow is a supersonic, medium range, aerial-intercept missile

The AIM-7F joined the Air Force inventory in 1976 as the primary medium-range, air-to-air missile for the F-15 Eagle. The AIM-7F was an almost completely new missile, gaining ability from improved avionics that allowed the warhead to be moved to the front, allowing a bigger motor to be carried that has improved range.

AIM-7M

rim7sp_01-jpg21a14892-6efa-45bf-bc06-dc5065392368largerAIM-7M Sparrow is a supersonic, medium range, aerial-intercept missile

The AIM-7M, the only current operational version, entered service in 1982. It has improved reliability and performance over earlier models at low altitudes and in electronic countermeasures environments. It also has a significantly more lethal warhead. The latest software version of the AIM-7M is the H-Build, which has been produced since 1987 and incorporates additional improvements in guidance. AIM/RIM-7M DT and OT was successfully completed in FY82. The F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon fighters carry the AIM-7M Sparrow. Source fas.org

AIM-120 AMRAAM Slammer

59b73e780a816ca18912abf3b75aad1bAIM-120C AMRAAM

The AIM-120 advanced medium-range air-to-air missile (AMRAAM) is a new generation air-to-air missile. It has an all-weather, beyond-visual-range capability and is scheduled to be operational beyond 2000. AMRAAM is a supersonic, air launched, aerial intercept, guided missile employing active radar target tracking, proportional navigation guidance, and active Radio Frequency (RF) target detection. It employs active, semi-active, and inertial navigational methods of guidance to provide an autonomous launch and leave capability against single and multiple targets in all environments.

The AMRAAM weighs 340 pounds and uses an advanced solid-fuel rocket motor to achieve a speed of Mach 4 and a range in excess of 30 miles. In long-range engagements AMRAAM heads for the target using inertial guidance and receives updated target information via data link from the launch aircraft. It transitions to a self-guiding terminal mode when the target is within range of its own monopulse radar set. The AIM-120 also has a “home-on-jam” guidance mode to counter electronic jamming. With its sophisticated avionics, high closing speed, and excellent end-game maneuverability, chances of escape from AMRAAM are minimal. Upon intercept an active-radar proximity fuze detonates the 40-pound high-explosive warhead to destroy the target. At closer ranges AMRAAM guides itself all the way using its own radar, freeing the launch aircraft to engage other targets.

Variants

Presently, there are three series of AMRAAM: AIM-120A, AIM-120B, and AIM-120C.

AIM-120A.  First production AIM-120A, delivered by Hughes in 1988 to the 33d TFW at Eglin AFB, Florida.

AIM-120B and AIM-120C versions are currently in production, the latter with smaller control surfaces to permit increased internal carriage capability in the F-22. AIM-120B deliveries began in FY 94, and AIM-120C deliveries began in FY 96.

P3I.  An improvement program seeks to develop AMRAAM capabilities, including software reprogrammability, advanced counter-countermeasures, and options for improved propulsion.

AIM-120C AMRAAM 

The AIM-120A is a non-reprogrammable missile (requires a hardware change to upgrade the missile software). The AIM-120B/C is reprogrammable through the missile umbilical using Common Field-level Memory Reprogramming Equipment (CFMRE). The AIM-120C has smaller aerosurfaces to enable internal carriage on the Air Force F-22 aircraft. The USAF All-Up-Round (AUR) container houses an internal cable which enables up to four missiles to be reprogrammed while in the container. USN containers are not equipped with the cable and must be opened to reprogram the missile. All three AMRAAM variants are currently approved for use on the F-15C/D/E, F-16C/D, and F/A-18C/D aircraft. Source fas.org

AGM-130 Missile

The AGM-130, in production for the U.S. Air Force, provides the warfighter with advanced combat capabilities for superior effectiveness.

Mission
The AGM-130 is a powered air-to-surface missile designed for high- and low-altitude strikes at standoff ranges against a variety of targets.

Features
Carrying forward the modular concept of the GBU-15 guided weapon system, the AGM-130 employs a rocket motor for extended range and an altimeter for altitude control. The AGM-130 provides a significantly increased standoff range than the GBU-15. The AGM-130 has two variants, based on the warhead: the AGM-130A with a MK-84 blast/fragmentation warhead and the AGM-130C with a BLU-109 penetrator.

The AGM-130 is equipped with either a television or an imaging infrared seeker and data link. The seeker provides the launch aircraft a visual presentation of the target as seen from the weapon. During free flight this presentation is transmitted by the AXQ-14 data-link system to the aircraft cockpit monitor.

The seeker can be either locked onto the target before or after launch for automatic weapon guidance, or it can be manually steered by a weapon systems officer. Manual steering is performed through the two-way data link.

The AGM-130 is designed for use in the F-15E aircraft. The development of the AGM-130 was initiated in 1984 as a product improvement to the GBU-15 guided glide bomb system. In the mid-1990s, the AGM-130 weapon system received a significant modification upgrade when Global Positioning System and inertial navigation systems guidance capabilities were added. This combined enhancement provided the AGM-130 weapon system with an adverse weather capability.

A US Air Force (USAF) F-15E Strike Eagle aircraft assigned to the 494th Fighter Squadron (FS), Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath, United Kingdom (UK), releases a specially painted AGM-130 Missile over the Utah Test and Training Range during Exercise Combat Hammer, a Weapon System Evaluation Program conducted at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah (UT).

The first unit was operational in 1994.

Primary Function: Air-to-surface guided and powered bomb
Contractor: Boeing Co.
Thrust: Classified
Length: 12 feet, 10.5 inches (3.90 meters)
Launch Weight: 2,917 pounds (1,312.65 kilograms)
Diameter: 18 inches (45.72 centimeters)
Wingspan: 59 inches (149.86 centimeters)
Range: Classified
Ceiling: 30,000-plus feet (9,091 meters)
Speed: Classified
Guidance System: television/imaging infrared seeker man-in-the-loop; autonomous GPS/INS
Date Deployed: 1994

Source af.mil

The AIM-9 Sidewinder has a range of 8km, while the range of Sparrow is 45km. The AMRAAM can strike aerial targets within the range of 55km.

The air-to-ground weapon systems aboard the F-15 include precision-guided munitions such as AGM-84D Harpoon anti-ship missiles and AGM-84E SLAM-Expanded Response (ER) air-to-ground missiles.

AGM-84 Harpoon, SLAM, SLAM-ER

himars-mlrs-3d-model-obj-fbx-blend-dae-mtl-x3d

The Harpoon missile provides the Navy and the Air Force with a common missile for air, ship, and submarine launches. The weapon system uses mid-course guidance with a radar seeker to attack surface ships. Its low-level, sea-skimming cruise trajectory, active radar guidance and warhead design assure high survivability and effectiveness. The Harpoon missile and its launch control equipment provide the warfighter capability to interdict ships at ranges well beyond those of other aircraft.

The Harpoon missile was designed to sink warships in an open-ocean environment. Other weapons (such as the Standard and Tomahawk missiles) can be used against ships, but Harpoon and Penguin are the only missiles used by the United States military with anti-ship warfare as the primary mission. Once targeting information is obtained and sent to the Harpoon missile, it is fired. Once fired, the missile flys to the target location, turns on its seeker, locates the target and strikes it without further action from the firing platform. This allows the firing platform to engage other threats instead of concentrating on one at a time.

An appropriately configured HARPOON can be launched from an AERO-65 bomb rack, AERO-7/A bomb rack, MK 6 canister, MK 7 shock resistant canister, MK 12 thickwall canister, MK 112 ASROC launcher, MK 8 and MK 116 TARTAR launcher, or submarine torpedo tube launcher.

South Korean F-15K with AGM-84D Harpoon anti-ship missile – Mu Yeol Lee 

The AGM-84D Harpoon is an all-weather, over-the-horizon, anti-ship missile system produced by Boeing [formerly McDonnell Douglas]. The Harpoon’s active radar guidance, warhead design, and low-level, sea-skimming cruise trajectory assure high survivability and effectiveness. The missile is capable of being launched from surface ships, submarines, or (without the booster) from aircraft. The AGM-84D was first introduced in 1977, and in 1979 an air-launched version was deployed on the Navy’s P-3 Orion aircraft. Originally developed for the Navy to serve as its basic anti-ship missile for fleetwide use, the AGM-84D also has been adapted for use on the Air Force’s B-52G bombers, which can carry from eight to 12 of the missiles.

The AGM-84E Harpoon/SLAM [Stand-Off Land Attack Missile] Block 1E is an intermediate range weapon system designed to provide day, night and adverse weather precision strike capability against high value land targets and ships in port. In the late 1980s, a land-attack missile was needed. Rather than design one from scratch, the US Navy took everything from Harpoon except the guidance and seeker sections, added a Global Positioning System receiver, a Walleye optical guidance system, and a Maverick data-link to create the Stand-off Land Attack Missile (SLAM). The AGM-84E uses an inertial navigation system with GPS, infrared terminal guidance, and is fitted with a Tomahawk warhead for better penetration. SLAM can be launched from land-based or aircraft carrier-based F/A-18 Hornet aircraft. It was employed successfully in Operation Desert Storm and UN relief operations in Bosnia prior to Operation Joint Endeavor.

slam-er_graphic

The SLAM-ER (Expanded Response) Block 1F, a major upgrade to the SLAM missile that is currently in production, provides over twice the missile range, target penetration capability, and control range of SLAM. SLAM-ER has a greater range (150+ miles), a titanium warhead for increased penetration, and software improvements which allow the pilot to retarget the impact point of the missile during the terminal phase of attack (about the last five miles). In addition, many expansions are being made to improve performance, survivability, mission planning, and pilot (man-in-the-loop) interface. The SLAM-ER development contract was awarded to McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (Now BOEING) in February of 1995. SLAM-ER achieved its first flight in March of 1997. All Navy SLAM missiles are currently planned to be retrofitted to SLAM-ER configuration. About 500 SLAM missiles will be converted to the SLAM-ER configuration between FY 1997 and FY 2001.

Primary Function: Air-to-surface anti-ship missile
Mission Maritime ship attack
Targets Maritime surface
Service Navy and Air Force
Contractor: Boeing [ex McDonnell Douglas]
Power Plant: Teledyne Turbojet and solid propellant booster for surface and submarine launch
Program status Operational
  sea-launch air-launch SLAM SLAM-ER
First capability 1977 1979    
Thrust: 660 pounds
Length: 15 feet 
(4.55 meters)
12 feet, 7 inches 
(3.79 meters)
14 feet, 8 inches 
(4.49 meters)
Weight: 1,470 pounds 
(661.5 kilograms)
1,145 pounds 
(515.25 kilograms)
1,385 pounds 
(629.55 kilograms)
Diameter: 13.5 inches (34.29 centimeters)
Wingspan: 3 feet (91.44 centimeters)
Range: Greater than 60 nautical miles 150+ miles
Speed: 855 km/h
Guidance System: Sea-skimming cruise with mid-course guidance monitored by radar altimeter, active seeker radar terminal homing inertial navigation system with GPS, infrared terminal guidance
Warheads: Penetration high-explosive blast (488 pounds)
Explosive Destex
Fuze Contact
Development cost $320.7 million
Production cost $2,882.3 million
Total acquisition cost $3,203.0 million
Acquisition unit cost $527,416
Production unit cost $474,609
Quantity Navy: 5,983; Air Force: 90
Platforms A-6F/A-18, S-3, P-3, B-52H, ships

Source fas.org

South Korean F-15K with  AGM-84E SLAM-ER air-to-ground missile – GPS/IIR-guided AGM-84H SLAM-ER cruise missiles that can deliver accurate hits on ships and land targets up to 250 km away

Seoul to deploy Asia’s first Taurus missiles: Details

Excerpt

The South Korean military will deploy within a few months “jamming proof” air-to-ground guided missiles in a move to quickly enhance the country’s ability to detect and destroy North Korea’s weapons of mass destruction, officials said Tuesday.

Dozens of Taurus missiles that can be carried on F-15K fighters will be delivered from Germany by the end of this year.

The development follows the U.S. government’s approval of exports of military GPS receivers that can be attached to war planes. These are what makes the missiles jamming proof as they would be unaffected by North Korean GPS.

Taurus KEPD 350 missile system

The air-to-ground guided Taurus KEPD 350 missile system has an overall weight of 1,400kg. It has a length of 16.7ft, wingspan of 6.7ft and diameter of 3.5ft. It falls under the MTCR category two weaponry.

The missile is made of modular sections which can be configured based on the individual missions. Its electronic systems are also modular. APCON has supplied the missile seeker electronics.

The Taurus missile is suitable for day and night and all weather deployment. It has low observability and terrain masking features for survivability. The modular design and reliability reduce the lifecycle cost of the system.

The missile carries about 481kg of inert multi-effect penetrator, high sophisticated and target optimised (MEPHISTO) dual stage warhead system for superior target penetration. The ignition system of the warhead is based on programmable intelligent multipurpose fuse (PIMPF).

The programmable fuse is designed with layer counting and void sensing technology. It was developed by TDW Gesellschaft für verteidigungstechnische Wirksysteme.

The blast and fragmentation capabilities eliminate the collateral damage to civil facilities near the target. The stand-off and precision capabilities of the missile and deployment range of more than 350km ensure maximum safety to the aircraft and crew.

Taurus KEPD 350 is powered by Williams P8300-15 Turbofan engine which provides the missile with a cruise speed of about Mach 0.6 to 0.95 at very low altitudes. The missile has a range of up to 500km (270nm) which is about 15% more than the ones propelled with JP10 fuel.

Navigation of the missile is controlled through Tri-Tec navigation system. It combines data from an inertial navigation system (INS), MIL-global positioning system (GPS), terrain reference navigation (TRN) and infrared seeker based image based navigation (IBN) sensors.

The missile can also navigate long distances without the GPS subsystem. It is equipped with an integrated mission planning system to determine its flight path.

Specification:
Type : Long-range air-to-surface missile
Weight : 1,400 kg
Length : 5.1 m
Diameter : 1.08 m
Warhead : 500 kg, Mephisto (Multi-Effect Penetrator, HIgh Sophisticated and Target Optimised)
Engine : Williams P8300-15 Turbofan
Wingspan : 2.064 m
Operational range : over 500 km
Flight altitude : 30–40 m
Speed : Mach 0.80~0.95
Guidance system : IBN (Image Based Navigation), INS (Inertial Navigation System), TRN (Terrain Referenced Navigation) and MIL-GPS (Global Positioning System)

Spec source militaryknowledge.blogspot.com

South Korea has released photos of a Taurus KEPD 350 cruise missile being loaded on its F-15K Slam Eagle jet. Seoul announced that its Taurus KEPD 350 cruise missile is now ready for combat.

40 missiles were recently delivered to the country earlier this month.

South Korea planned to acquire and integrate the missile with its F-15K Slam Eagles after being refused Lockheed Martin’s AGM-158 JASSM by the U.S.

Taurus KEPD 350 is the first European missile to be integrated onto a Korean fighter aircraft. Source defense-watch.com

Targeting and countermeasures

“The F-15K Slam Eagle can fly at a maximum speed of Mach 2.5.”

The AN/APG-63 (V)1 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar fitted to the F-15K is equipped with air-to-air and air-to-ground capabilities. The radar can track high-flying and low-flying targets, ground moving targets and sea surface targets. It provides high-resolution ground maps for identifying targets at long ranges.

APG-63(V)1

APG-63(V)1 mechanical-scanned array radar. With the A/G software of the APG-70 ported to the new platform, new sea surface and track modes and ground moving target track capability were added to meet the specific needs of the Republic of Korea. The new radar also has some kind of NCTR capabilities ( Non-Cooperative Target Identification/Recognition), although this area is highly classified. It is safe to say that the end result turned out to be the best F-15 radar in the world ever (including radars in other foreign versions, for example the F-15I Raam). Source 15e.info

General data:  
Type: Radar Altitude Max: 0 m
Range Max: 185.2 km Altitude Min: 0 m
Range Min: 0.4 km Generation: Early 1990s
Properties: Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) [Side Info], Non-Coperative Target Recognition (NCTR) – Jet Engine Modulation [Class Info], Continous Tracking Capability [Phased Array Radar], Track While Scan (TWS), Low Probability of Intercept (LPI), Pulse Doppler Radar (Full LDSD Capability), Continuous Wave Illumination
Sensors / EW:
AN/APG-63(V)1 – (LPI) Radar
Role: Radar, FCR, Air-to-Air & Air-to-Surface, Medium-Range
Max Range: 185.2 km

Source cmano-db.com

The F-15K uses Link-16 Fighter Data Link to distribute target information to other aircraft during coordinated air-to-air missions. The onboard Hands-on Throttle and Stick (HOTAS) controls allow the crew to operate weaponry, radars, avionics and other mission equipment. The aircraft is equipped with late-generation targeting and navigation systems such as forward-looking infrared (FLIR) and infrared search and track (IRST).

Link 16 data net system

6666globalmilitarycommunications.com

ViaSat’s team is leading the transformation in Link 16 Airborne Terminal technology by being the first to upgrade the design of many components of the terminal to provide greater flexibility, enhanced technological capabilities, decreased cost and improved reliability. Embedded modules provide COMSEC and TACAN.

figure-8-mids-lvt-platform-integration-requirements researchgate.net

Through extensive use of reprogrammable components and a modular VME architecture, we’ve provided a lower cost design while also allowing for future requirements. Our terminal provides all operational modes of the Link 16 waveform, and implements all required Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) host interfaces for both U.S. and Coalition integration. Our hardware implements Enhanced Throughput, a new capability that can increase coded data throughput from its current maximum of 115.2 kbps to over 800 kbps. Host interfaces and operational employment of this capability are still in the planning stages.

figure-11-mids-platform-integration-scheme-for-the-fa-18researchgate.net

Together with Harris and European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company (EADS), ViaSat is delivering a family of combat-proven, fully qualified, and EMC-Certified Link 16 MIDS terminals to U.S. Forces and Coalition partners under contracts to the Navy MIDS International Program Office (IPO) and other commercial customers. Source viasat.com

The integrated Tactical Electronic Warfare Suite (TEWS) integrates ALR-56C(V)1 early warning receiver, ALQ-135M jammer and ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispenser System (CMDS). The CMDS can launch conventional chaff and flare decoys to deceive anti-aircraft threats.

ALR-56C(V)1 early warning receiver

General data:  
Type: ESM Altitude Max: 0 m
Range Max: 222.2 km Altitude Min: 0 m
Range Min: 0 km Generation: Early 2000s
Sensors / EW:
AN/ALR-56C(V)1 TEWS – ESM
Role: RWR, Radar Warning Receiver
Max Range: 222.2 km

ALQ-135 system

download (1)Tactical Electronic Warfare System ( TEWS) suit received modifications as well the ALQ-135 system the improved and received a new designation as ALQ-135M

The AN/ALQ-135 is an internally mounted radio frequency jammer. It provides self-protection countermeasures against radar-related threats. It is an integral port of the F-15 Tactical Electronic Warfare Suite which also includes ALR-56C warning system and ALE-45 chaff/flare dispenser.

The F-15C Eagle fighter aircraft are equipped with the ALQ-135 Band 3, Band 2 and Band 1. The F-15E Strike Eagle are protected by the ALQ-135 Band 1.5 and 3. The USAF was replacing existing ALQ-135 band 1 and 2 with new Band 1.5 jammers in the early years of the 21st century.

The improved AN/ALQ-135M was developed to protect the Republic of Korea Air Force (RoKAF) F-15K aircraft against multiple threats simultaneously. The first five production ALQ-135Ms were delivered to the Boeing Company which will install them into the F-15K aircraft. 

The internally mounted ALQ-135M prioritizes and neutralizes the most imminent dangers thanks to a new processor that offers increased speed and memory enhancements compared to older ALQ-135 models. Weight was reduced by 63 percent and volume by 71 percent. In addition, sophisticated microwave power module transmitter technology helps reduce weight and boost performance. Source deagel.com

f-15k-slam-eagle-rokaf-fighter-aircraft2_-_easternblogger.wordpress.com

ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispenser System (CMDS)

The ALE-47 is so advanced, it thinks for itself. The system uses information from integrated electronic warfare sensors such as radar warning receivers and missile warning receivers to determine the correct response to defeat infrared and radio-frequency guided missiles. The cockpit crew has complete control of their threat situation by choosing to operate in any of the four modes: automatic, semi-automatic, manual, or bypass.

Adaptable

  • Interchangeable with obsolete ALE-40, ALE-39, and M-130 systems
  • Simply integrates with electronic warfare systems, providing extreme versatility
  • Uses U.S. and NATO standard and new radio frequency and infrared decoys
  • Glass cockpit compatible

Source baesystems.com

Boeing 737 AEW&C: Details

Engines and performance

3 F-15K at Nellis AFB, Nevada, 2008 for the Red Flag 08-4 exercise

The first 40 F-15K fighters are powered by two GE F110 turbofan engines, each developing 29,000lb of thrust per engine. The aircraft procured under Next Fighter II programme are equipped with two Pratt & Whitney F-100-PW-229 EEP engines. Each engine provides a thrust of 29,100lb.

overview_enginesf-15e.info

2 x GE F-110-129 engines

4erevolution.com

Manufacturer: General Electric Co.
Thrust: F110-GE-129: 29,500 pounds; F110-GE-132: 32,000 pounds
Overall Pressure Ratio at Maximum Power: F110-GE-129: 30.7; F110-GE-132: 33.3
Thrust-to-Weight Ratio: F110-GE-129: 7.29; F110-GE-132: 7.90
Compressor: Two spool, axial flow, three-stage fan
LP-HP Compressor Stages: 0-9
HP-LP Turbine Stages: 1-2
Combustor Type: Annular
Length: 182.3 in (4.63 m)
Diameter: 46.5 in (118 cm)
Dry Weight: F110-GE-129: 3,980 lbs (1,805 kg); F110-GE-132: 4,050 lbs (1,837 kg)
Platforms: F-16 Fighting Falcon; F-14 (retired); F-15K Slam Eagle; F-15SA; F-15SG; F-2

Source fi-powerweb.com

2x Pratt & Whitney F-100-PW-229 EEP engines

aar.jpgPratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 [Graphic by Pratt & Whitney] – f-16.net

Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney (United Technologies)
Thrust: 17,800 pounds dry thrust; 29,160 pounds with afterburner
Overall Pressure Ratio at Maximum Power: 32
Thrust-to-Weight Ratio: 7.6
Bypass Ratio: 0.36
Compressor: Two spool, axial flow, three-stage fan
LP-HP Compressor Stages: 0-10
HP-LP Turbine Stages: 2-2
Combustor Type: Annular
Length: 191 in (4.85 m)
Engine Control: FADEC
Diameter: 46.5 in (1.18 m)
Dry Weight: 3,836 lbs (1,744 kg)

Source fi-powerweb.com

Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229 (EEP) engines 

The F-15K Slam Eagle can fly at a maximum speed of Mach 2.5. The combat radius or endurance of the aircraft is more than 1,800km. The aircraft can perform terrain-following flight at a minimum altitude of 100ft with a speed of Mach 0.93. It has a maximum gross take-off weight of 36,740kg.

Main material source airforce-technology.com

Revised Jul 03, 2017

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